Selecciona Edición
Conéctate
Selecciona Edición
Tamaño letra
The 10 most popular local fiestas in Spain

The 10 most popular local fiestas in Spain

10 fotos

From water fights and medieval processions to Viking funerals and fire-making workshops, take a look at some of the country’s most colorful and curious festivities

  • Every July, Tortosa heads back in time to the 16th century. Inside the town’s ramparts, processions representing the era’s defense armies and the local district delegates, guilds, merchants, clowns and local townsmen fill the streets of the old quarter, building a picture of one of Tortosa’s most exciting periods in history. The buildings are draped in tapestries and there are shows, workshops and gastronomic events complete with medieval recipes and sweets such as the ‘Llepolies de la Festa,’ while the local bars and restaurants are decorated to resemble renaissance establishments. These fiestas have won first prize in the 2019 My Fiesta is the Best competition run by the website Club Rural to boost tourism in Spain’s interior, fight depopulation and raise the profile of little-known festivals which help to preserve local culture. Tortosa won 29.5% of the nearly 16,000 votes cast.
    1Renaissance Fiesta, Tortosa, Tarragona Every July, Tortosa heads back in time to the 16th century. Inside the town’s ramparts, processions representing the era’s defense armies and the local district delegates, guilds, merchants, clowns and local townsmen fill the streets of the old quarter, building a picture of one of Tortosa’s most exciting periods in history. The buildings are draped in tapestries and there are shows, workshops and gastronomic events complete with medieval recipes and sweets such as the ‘Llepolies de la Festa,’ while the local bars and restaurants are decorated to resemble renaissance establishments. These fiestas have won first prize in the 2019 My Fiesta is the Best competition run by the website Club Rural to boost tourism in Spain’s interior, fight depopulation and raise the profile of little-known festivals which help to preserve local culture. Tortosa won 29.5% of the nearly 16,000 votes cast.
  • The Chúndara won second place in the Club Rural’s My Fiesta is the Best in 2019 with 13.1% of the vote. This is a three-day event – this year from August 15 to 17 – in which thousands of revelers celebrate the fiestas of Our Lady and Saint Roque of Peñafiel. Every afternoon at 5pm, to the call of “chúndara, tarata chúndara” – a version of Quintín Esquembre’s La Entrada pasodoble – a procession makes its way through the streets of the town from the Plaza de España square to the Plaza del Coso square while onlookers hurl buckets of water at them from the balconies en route. The popular fiesta has been celebrated since 1950.
    2The Chúndara, Peñafiel, Valladolid The Chúndara won second place in the Club Rural’s My Fiesta is the Best in 2019 with 13.1% of the vote. This is a three-day event – this year from August 15 to 17 – in which thousands of revelers celebrate the fiestas of Our Lady and Saint Roque of Peñafiel. Every afternoon at 5pm, to the call of “chúndara, tarata chúndara” – a version of Quintín Esquembre’s La Entrada pasodoble – a procession makes its way through the streets of the town from the Plaza de España square to the Plaza del Coso square while onlookers hurl buckets of water at them from the balconies en route. The popular fiesta has been celebrated since 1950.
  • This fiesta is celebrated every year from September 7 to 13 in the region of Tudela to mark Virgin of Peace Day. It starts with the re-enactment of the traditional ‘bringing of the cows,’ which involves herding livestock along the banks of the River Alhama to the town. Another tradition is the Gigantón, a troupe of giants and ‘big heads’ who make their way from the old town to the Plaza de los Fueros square. Meanwhile, there is much guzzling of pink and white caramel-based sweets known as the virgin’s braids. For more information, contact Fiestas de la Virgen de la Paz.
    3Virgin of Peace Festival, Citruénigo, Navarre This fiesta is celebrated every year from September 7 to 13 in the region of Tudela to mark Virgin of Peace Day. It starts with the re-enactment of the traditional ‘bringing of the cows,’ which involves herding livestock along the banks of the River Alhama to the town. Another tradition is the Gigantón, a troupe of giants and ‘big heads’ who make their way from the old town to the Plaza de los Fueros square. Meanwhile, there is much guzzling of pink and white caramel-based sweets known as the virgin’s braids. For more information, contact Fiestas de la Virgen de la Paz.
  • This festival has been held since 1972 when a group of winemakers encouraged farming and agricultural associations to celebrate the wine culture in the area. Wine-making was introduced here by in ancient Roman times and has been thriving ever since. The current fiesta, which consists of 30 events, has been declared a regional tourist attraction and this year runs from August 9 to 18. As always, it will include the inauguration of the so-called Wine Fountain that includes gifts of grapes. Children have their own procession and are given grape juice rather than wine to drink. More information: fiestadelavendimia.com.
    4Vendimia Fiesta, Jumilla, Murcia This festival has been held since 1972 when a group of winemakers encouraged farming and agricultural associations to celebrate the wine culture in the area. Wine-making was introduced here by in ancient Roman times and has been thriving ever since. The current fiesta, which consists of 30 events, has been declared a regional tourist attraction and this year runs from August 9 to 18. As always, it will include the inauguration of the so-called Wine Fountain that includes gifts of grapes. Children have their own procession and are given grape juice rather than wine to drink. More information: fiestadelavendimia.com.
  • The fiestas of Saint Atiliano – August 27 to September 1 – kick off by celebrating the day of Cipotegato. When the bells ring 12 in Tarazona, the character of Cipotegato emerges from the town hall dressed in a harlequin suit to be met with a barrage of rotting tomatoes, which triggers a general tomato war. For more information: tarazona.es.
    5Cipotegato, Tarazona, Zaragoza The fiestas of Saint Atiliano – August 27 to September 1 – kick off by celebrating the day of Cipotegato. When the bells ring 12 in Tarazona, the character of Cipotegato emerges from the town hall dressed in a harlequin suit to be met with a barrage of rotting tomatoes, which triggers a general tomato war. For more information: tarazona.es. GETTY
  • The Vikings almost invaded Galicia several times or so say the people of Foz, who are still celebrating these failed attempts which were neatly curtailed by the bishop Saint Gonzalo who, according to legend, prayed from the Alto de la Grela for the attacks to stop. The episode is commemorated over three days – this year from August 30 to September 1 – with a medieval market and a colorful reenactment of the Vikings landing at Tupide beach, where a Viking funeral takes place against a backdrop of drums and flaming torches at nightfall. The festival ends with the smallest citizens of the town reenacting a landing of their own.
    6Normanda Festival, Foz, Lugo The Vikings almost invaded Galicia several times or so say the people of Foz, who are still celebrating these failed attempts which were neatly curtailed by the bishop Saint Gonzalo who, according to legend, prayed from the Alto de la Grela for the attacks to stop. The episode is commemorated over three days – this year from August 30 to September 1 – with a medieval market and a colorful reenactment of the Vikings landing at Tupide beach, where a Viking funeral takes place against a backdrop of drums and flaming torches at nightfall. The festival ends with the smallest citizens of the town reenacting a landing of their own.
  • The devil is one of the main attractions at these fiestas held at the end of August in honor of the Virgin of Candelaria. Every year in the early hours of September 7, a satanic figure framed by 100 kilos of fiberglass is taken to the town square where it is met by fireworks and live music. The revelers, who have been dancing in the square all evening, never know from what direction the red-eyed Lucifer will come, adding to the thrill. For more information: La Palma Tourism
    7Dance of the Devil, Tijarafe, La Palma The devil is one of the main attractions at these fiestas held at the end of August in honor of the Virgin of Candelaria. Every year in the early hours of September 7, a satanic figure framed by 100 kilos of fiberglass is taken to the town square where it is met by fireworks and live music. The revelers, who have been dancing in the square all evening, never know from what direction the red-eyed Lucifer will come, adding to the thrill. For more information: La Palma Tourism Getty
  • Running from September 6 to 10, the Tura fiestas have been declared a cultural asset of Catalonia. September 8 is the big day with a procession of giants and dwarfs and knights who converge on the main square. When night falls, the streetlamps are turned off and lanterns are lit to guide the so-called ‘turinada,’ a procession that snakes from the center of Olot to Tura street where a special dance takes place with music, water and giant balloons. The five-day festival also includes flower fights and carriage processions.
    8Tura Festival, Olot, Girona Running from September 6 to 10, the Tura fiestas have been declared a cultural asset of Catalonia. September 8 is the big day with a procession of giants and dwarfs and knights who converge on the main square. When night falls, the streetlamps are turned off and lanterns are lit to guide the so-called ‘turinada,’ a procession that snakes from the center of Olot to Tura street where a special dance takes place with music, water and giant balloons. The five-day festival also includes flower fights and carriage processions. GETTY
  • The first Friday of every August – this year August 3 – Piñar locals haul out their furs and ivory trinkets and dress up as troglodytes and enjoy workshops that are set up for making tools and fire the prehistoric way. The festival is linked to the Ventanas cave – declared an Asset of Cultural Interest (BIC) – which can be accessed from the town. At nightfall, there is a prehistoric barbecue. For more information: Fiesta Troglodita.
    9Troglodyte Fiesta, Piñar, Granada The first Friday of every August – this year August 3 – Piñar locals haul out their furs and ivory trinkets and dress up as troglodytes and enjoy workshops that are set up for making tools and fire the prehistoric way. The festival is linked to the Ventanas cave – declared an Asset of Cultural Interest (BIC) – which can be accessed from the town. At nightfall, there is a prehistoric barbecue. For more information: Fiesta Troglodita.
  • For the past 200 years, Ibi locals have been battling each other with an arsenal of flour, eggs, firecrackers and rotten fruit every December 28 to mark the festival of Els Enfarinats. In the 1950s, the tradition was dropped but resumed again in the 1980s and in 2019 it was recognized as a Festivity of Regional Interest. Also known as the Justícia Nova fiesta, it was inspired by the ancient Roman Saturnalia festival, in honor of Saturn, when, curiously, the Romans reversed roles with their slaves to be ordered about for the day. The modern interpretation of the celebration recreates a battle against a fictitious coup – on one side, those wrapped in blankets armed with flour – the bailiff, mayor, judge and secretary – and on the other, the opposition consisting of the king and the viceroy.
    10Els Enfarinats, Ibi, Alicante For the past 200 years, Ibi locals have been battling each other with an arsenal of flour, eggs, firecrackers and rotten fruit every December 28 to mark the festival of Els Enfarinats. In the 1950s, the tradition was dropped but resumed again in the 1980s and in 2019 it was recognized as a Festivity of Regional Interest. Also known as the Justícia Nova fiesta, it was inspired by the ancient Roman Saturnalia festival, in honor of Saturn, when, curiously, the Romans reversed roles with their slaves to be ordered about for the day. The modern interpretation of the celebration recreates a battle against a fictitious coup – on one side, those wrapped in blankets armed with flour – the bailiff, mayor, judge and secretary – and on the other, the opposition consisting of the king and the viceroy. GETTY